Events & Tickets

Brooklyn Village

Saturday, March 24, 2012 - Sunday, March 25, 2012

Brooklyn Village

 

From its early settlement through present day, Brooklyn remains a village of workers and artists bursting with creativity, passion and rebellion; a community where the famous and the faceless make history together.

Join us for a groundbreaking musical and multimedia experience, as we journey through time to connect Brooklyn’s past and present with a program of classics and stunning world premieres.

Program: World Premieres by David T. Little, Matthew Mehlan and Sarah Kirkland Snider, with additional works by Ludwig van Beethoven, George Frederich Bristow, Aaron Copland, and Sufjan Stevens

This concert was a co-production of the Brooklyn Philharmonic, Brooklyn Youth Chorus, and Roulette Theater.

Brooklyn Philharmonic – Alan Pierson, Artistic Director
Brooklyn Youth Chorus – Dianne Berkun, Artistic Director

Ted Sperling, Director
Mellissa Hughes, Vocalist
Royce Vavrek, Librettist

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Sarah K. Snider’s piece Here (2012) followed, performed impeccably, a cappella and from memory by the BYC conducted by Dianne Berkun. One never knows where to start when talking about the BYC since their overall musicianship is remarkable (solid pitch, diction, sense of shape and textures.)” —I Care If You Listen

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“…as a whole ‘Brooklyn Village’ was irresistible, suffused with conviction and ennobling warmth. To witness it was to feel a part of it.” —The New York Times

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“The Brooklyn Youth Chorus brought out the purity and unpretentiousness of the text…their voices bearing genuine warmth and innate goodness…” —WQXR

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“Brooklyn Village was a people’s history of the borough in song.” —The L Magazine

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“But for Dianne Berkun, founder and artistic director of the Brooklyn Youth Chorus—which is celebrating its 20th anniversary season—the concept of Brooklyn as a village is as much a 21st-century reality as a 19th-century memory. ‘There’s a real sense of pride in Brooklyn on a deep level, because there’s so much creativity here and there are real communities here. There are families of generations and generations,’ she says.” —Time Out New York

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“This weekend, the Brooklyn Philharmonic and the Brooklyn Youth Chorus will perform a program called Brooklyn Village, which traces the borough’s history through music, from Aaron Copland to Sufjan Stevens. The centerpiece of the program is a new work by David T. Little, the 33-year-old composer and drummer who leads the “punk-classical” group Newspeak, called Am I Born, inspired by a painting in the Brooklyn Museum, Francis Guy’s Winter Scene. We spoke to Little, who lives in NJ but works and plays in Brooklyn, about how his piece came about, and also about the new music scene in Brooklyn.” —The L Magazine

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“Two venerable Brooklyn musical institutions have joined forces to present a multimedia performance. The Brooklyn Philharmonic, in its debut season under Alan Pierson, and the Brooklyn Youth Chorus (BYC), celebrating its 20th anniversary, will combine their powers and skills for Brooklyn Village, described as an ‘homage to the creative spirit of Downtown Brooklyn as it has evolved over the last 200 years.’ “ —Brooklyn Eagle

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[David T. Little said,] “I used a few orchestration tricks, and worked really closely with the BYC’s Dianne Berkun and David Harris (who actually grew up in the Sacred Harp tradition) to help establish a game plan, and a list of techniques: certain vowels got flattened, certain diphthongs altered. It’s been really interesting, and I’m very happy with the results we’ve gotten.” —I Care if You Listen

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“If Brooklyn Youth Chorus is any indication of the future of Kings County, we can all rest assured that we’re at no risk of depreciating creativity or inspiration.” —Flavorpill

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“The unprecedented partnership presents an homage to the creative spirit of Downtown Brooklyn as it has evolved over the last 200 years.” —Brooklyn Downtown Star

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“More than a concert, the show promises an immersive experience for the audience, using video, sound, narration, staging and audience interaction to trace the development of Brooklyn from a small village to a global super city.” —Park Slope Patch

 

“For young musicians who are called on to perform the works of contemporary composers, utilizing “extended techniques” that one might readily encounter in 20th century compositions is not unusual. Being asked to interpret music inspired by an early 19th-century American style of shape note singing called Sacred Harp is decidedly more uncommon.” —Huffington Post

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